2019: The Hague

Neuronet is currently organising its annual networking and communication event. This will involve Innovative Medicine Initiative projects that work in the area of neurodegeneration research. The event will take place at the Alzheimer Europe Conference in The Hague. For more information and to register to the conference visit the Alzheimer Europe website.

Thursday, 24 October

10.30-12.00
Parallel session P5. European research collaboration in Alzheimer’s disease and beyond

Chairperson: Lennert Steukers (Belgium)

  • P5.1. Elisabetta Vaudano (Belgium): The Innovative Medicines Initiative and its neurodegeneration portfolio
  • P5.2. Carlos Diaz (Spain): Neuronet – Efficiently Networking European Neurodegeneration Research
  • P5.3. Ana Diaz (Luxembourg): Patient and Public Involvement in the IMI research portfolio

 

14.00-15.30
Parallel session P13. From risk to dementia – Understanding disease progression and its causes

Chairperson: Craig Ritchie (United Kingdom)

  • P13.1. Margot Bakker (Germany): ADAPTED – Alzheimer’s disease apolipoprotein pathology for treatment elucidation and development
  • P13.2. TBC (TBC): IMPRiND – Inhibiting Misfolded Protein Propagation in Neurodegenerative Diseases – EU IMI IMPRiND project overview
  • P13.3. Laurent Pradier (France): PHAGO – Targeting TREM2 and CD33 of phagocytes for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease
  • P13.4. Martin Hofmann-Apitius (Germany): AETIONOMY – Disease Mechanisms for Patient Subgroup Identification and Disease Progression Modeling

 

Friday, 25 October

10.30-12.00
Parallel session P21. Improving data access and the development of predictive models

Chairperson: Jacoline Bouvy (United Kingdom)

  • P21.1. Malcolm Macleod (United Kingdom): EQIPD – Data quality in preclinical research
  • P21.2. Pieter Jelle Visser (Netherlands): EMIF – European Medical Information Framework
  • P21.3. John Gallacher (United Kingdom): ROADMAP – Real world outcomes across the AD spectrum
  • P21.4. Dominique Lesuisse (France): IM2PACT – Discovery of blood-brain barrier targets and transport pathways to treat neuro/metabolic diseases – A public-private partnership

 

14.00-15.30
Parallel session P29. Diagnosis, patient engagement and trials

Chairperson: Carlos Diaz (Spain)

  • P29.1. José Luis Molinuevo (Spain): AMYPAD – Amyloid imaging to prevent Alzheimer’s disease
  • P29.2. Craig Ritchie (United Kingdom): EPAD – European prevention of Alzheimer’s dementia consortium
  • P29.3. Mercè Boada (Spain): MOPEAD – Models of Patient Engagement in Alzheimer’s Disease: a European project to develop and test innovative patient engagement strategies
  • P29.4. Dag Aarsland (United Kingdom): RADAR-AD – Remote Assessment of functional decline in Alzheimer’s Disease

 

 

Session 1

P4. ROADMAP: Disease outcomes

Integration of video What matters to whom as AD progresses? Relevant outcomes in disease progression

Presenters

Michael SMITH Michael SMITH

University of Edinburgh
Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Claire TOCHEL

Claire TOCHEL

University of Edinburgh
Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Christophe Bintener

Christophe Bintener

Alzheimer Europe
Luxembourg.

Christin BEXELIUS

Christin BEXELIUS

Member of the EWGPWD
Roche, Basel, Switzerland

 

 

Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia-related diseases are affecting more and more people, as the population is getting older. Due to the increasing number of people affected by the condition, the need for new treatment alternatives and better care plans is higher than ever before, both for people living with dementia and their families but also for society at large.

In order to be able to better evaluate new emerging interventions, systems that can take into account all available healthcare information – often referred to as real-world data (RWD) – are needed. ROADMAP is a project bringing together 26 partners from across Europe, aiming to investigate how such systems should be set up to meet the needs from different stakeholders, including regulatory bodies and payers. The ROADMAP work stream “Outcome Definition” aimed to identify a priority set of real-world dementia outcomes, focussing on AD, across the disease spectrum, from a diversity of stakeholder perspectives.

To achieve this, a systematic literature review and a survey were conducted. In addition, PPI consultations were carried out including among others the views of people with dementia and their carers.

The aim of this session is to present an overview of the full work process including preparation of PPI consultations, methods used and the results. The outlook focusses on how these results as well as the patients’ and caregivers’ voices could impact public decision-making.

Video

Session 2

P4. ROADMAP: Disease outcomes

Integration of video What matters to whom as AD progresses? Relevant outcomes in disease progression

Presenters

Michael SMITH

University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Claire TOCHEL

University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Christophe Bintener

Alzheimer Europe, Luxembourg.

Christin BEXELIUS

Member of the EWGPWD
Roche, Basel, Switzerland

 

 

Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia-related diseases are affecting more and more people, as the population is getting older. Due to the increasing number of people affected by the condition, the need for new treatment alternatives and better care plans is higher than ever before, both for people living with dementia and their families but also for society at large.

In order to be able to better evaluate new emerging interventions, systems that can take into account all available healthcare information – often referred to as real-world data (RWD) – are needed. ROADMAP is a project bringing together 26 partners from across Europe, aiming to investigate how such systems should be set up to meet the needs from different stakeholders, including regulatory bodies and payers. The ROADMAP work stream “Outcome Definition” aimed to identify a priority set of real-world dementia outcomes, focussing on AD, across the disease spectrum, from a diversity of stakeholder perspectives.

To achieve this, a systematic literature review and a survey were conducted. In addition, PPI consultations were carried out including among others the views of people with dementia and their carers.

The aim of this session is to present an overview of the full work process including preparation of PPI consultations, methods used and the results. The outlook focusses on how these results as well as the patients’ and caregivers’ voices could impact public decision-making.

Video